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The Volume of Solid Figures

5.MD.3
Answer Keys Here

Aligned To Common Core Standard:

Grade 5 Measurement and Data - 5.MD.3

How to Determine the Volume of Solid Figures? There are two categories of geometrical shapes in the world and it includes two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes. When it comes to two-dimensional shapes, we can calculate the two-dimensional area and the perimeter. As two-dimensional shapes do not have depth, they do not have a volume. It is not the case of three-dimensional shapes which have a length, width, and a depth. As these shapes have a depth, they occupy space, and have a volume. Volume is not just a measuring unit for how loud something is, it holds a number of different definitions. In mathematics and geometry, volume is the term that specifies the space within a three-dimensional shape. There are two ways of measuring volume for solid figures, the first one is by counting the cubic units and the second one is a straightforward method, which is to use formulae. The two formulae that help in measuring volume include; Volume= L × W × H and Volume= Base area × H When you know the length, width, and the height or depth of a solid figure, you can easily calculate its volume. The units of volume are cubic centimeter, cubic millimeter, cubic meter, liter, and gallon.

Printable Worksheets And Lessons




Homework Sheets

This one covers multiple skills including unit of cubes and volume.

  • Homework 1 - What is the volume of this object? The focus here is on dry measures.
  • Homework 2 - More dry measures you will use the standard formula, since we are working with mostly three dimensional rectangles.
  • Homework 3 - We bring in the third dimension here.



Practice Worksheets

There are no units of measure here, so you can leave the unit section blank.

  • Practice 1 - Larger objects to work with. You will need to number the blocks to make sense of it all.
  • Practice 2 - A bit of green and a little bit of red for you.
  • Practice 3 - These all have the same tint. Put a math spin on them?



Math Skill Quizzes

I could only fit six on each sheet. So these are out of sixty points.

  • Quiz 1 - Six problems for you to tackle. See how well you know this skill.
  • Quiz 2 - Thin and thick stands for you. A good way to gauge how much you know.
  • Quiz 3 - A little bit wider yet. We really like your idea here.


Why Do We Need to Calculate This Measure in Solids?

We often do things in math like make calculations that we do not understand the purpose behind. In this case understanding the volume that a solid object has many different real-world implications. For instance, we are currently in the process of getting my daughter ready to move into his college dorm room. We are only allowed a single standard vehicle on campus during the move in period to reduce campus traffic. My daughter plays lacrosse on her college team, so there are pieces of equipment that are not optional and must be packed. From there we are evaluating the amount of space all of the optional items that she wants to bring with her. The fact is that we cannot bring everything that she wants because it will not all fit in the car. While you can determine volume through dry and liquid measures, we are more interested in the dry volume. We took a tape measure and planned out how to get the maximum use of trunk. I can honestly say, math helped us pack that trunk perfectly. While this is just a simple example, think about when you travel by airplane or boat with luggage. They are making very similar applications. When you ship something via the U.S. Post Office, UPS, or FedEx, do you think those guys do not have understanding of volume? They surely are masters at it.