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Saint Patrick's Math Worksheets

Why Do We Celebrate Saint Patrick's Day? Along with so many culturally diverse celebrations held around the year, one very "green" celebration is known as Saint Patrick's Day. Every year, St. Patrick's Day falls on the 17th of March, remembering St. Patrick. He was an Irish patron who ministered Christianity in Ireland during the fifth century. St. Patron was raised in Roman Britain but was captured by Ireland and taken as a slave as a young adult. Some years later he returned to his family and returned to the church. Later, he went back to Ireland and worked as a missionary in the North and West of the country. Today, St. Patricks Day is symbolized by the "Shamrock." It is a leaf of the clover that signifies the Holy Trinity. People around the globe wear green and the flag of the Republic of Ireland. Parties are adorned with green color, and people enjoy traditional foods and sweets of Ireland. Some people also plan a pilgrimage to the St. Patrick's Purgatory. Time to get your green on! There is literally pots of gold in some of these worksheets. This should make for some fun in March.


Basic Starter Skills Sheets

  • Naming Shapes and ABOVE or BELOW(K.G.A.1) - Larry the Leprechaun needs to solve these problems to find his gold! Can you help him?
  • Telling Time(1.MD.B.3) - Invite Liam to your St. Patrick's Day party! Write the time of the party on the lines below, and also draw a picture of the time on the clock!
  • St. Patrick's Day Counting Coins(2.MD.C.8) - There is a legend that a leprechaun has a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. You find the pot of gold and are counting to see how many gold pieces there are.
  • Ones, Tens, and Hundreds Place(2.NBT.A.1) - Write the number that is in the ONES place inside the pot of gold.
  • Word Problems(3.OA.A.3 ) - You are bringing shamrock cookies to your class St. Patrick's Day Party. You have a recipe that will make 12 cookies, but there are 30 kids in your class.
  • Greater Than/Less Than/ Equal,(4.NBT.A.2) - Timothy and Tamara are arguing about who had a better class party for St. Patrick's Day. Help them compare using < > or =.
  • Reading Line Graphs(5.MD.B.2) - Adam, Chelsey, Patrick and Samantha spent their St. Patrick's Day weekend looking for lucky four-leaf clovers. They made a line plot graph of what they found.
  • Rewriting Expressions(6.EE.A.2a) - Rewrite these word problems as an expression, using a letter to represent the unknown number. Don't worry about finding the answers yet!
  • St. Patrick's Day Factors(6.NS.B.4) - A leprechaun was causing trouble and added incorrect factors to the lists below. Help sort out his mess by putting an "X" through the incorrect factors.
  • Area and Circumference of a Circle(7.G.B.4) - Help our leprechaun friend Lonnie find the area and circumference of his circular pieces of gold. He will give you the radius.
  • St. Patrick's Day Lucky Coin Flips(7.SP.C.5) - The four leaf clover is a symbol of good luck. However, luck can often be calculated using statistics and probability.
  • Solving Systems of Equations by Substitution(8.EE.C.8b) - Things have gotten really out of hand with lucky shamrock production this year. Grandfather Leprechaun uses some pretty complicated equations to figure out how many shamrocks should be lucky (represented by an X) for every regular shamrock (represented by a Y).

Full St. Pat's Worksheet Collection


Kindergarten, Grade 1 and 2


  • Counting Practice(K.CC.B.4) - COUNT the number of shamrocks!
  • More or Less Practice(K.CC.C.6) - Which group has MORE hats? Circle the group with MORE hats.
  • Day True or False Equations Practice(1.OA.D.7) - Help Paddy decide if these math problems are TRUE or FALSE.
  • Halves and Quarters(1.G.A.3) - Lily the Littlest Leprechaun knows that you are great at math and she needs you to help her to find HALF of these shapes. You should show her an example, and then teach her how! Draw a line cutting the shapes into two parts, then color in HALF.
  • Mental Math Attack! (2.OA.B.2) - Do as many of these addition problems in two minutes as you can! Get at least 8 correct to win the pot of gold!
  • Ms. McClernan's Class Party(2.OA.A.1) - Ms. McClernan wants to make sure she has everything she needs for a great celebration for all 20 students in her class. Help her find out what she needs to bring using addition and subtraction!
  • Counting Loose Change(2.MD.C.8) - Awesome!! We found a pot of gold! Let's count up how much money is inside!


Grade 3, 4, and 5


  • Four Leaf Clover Graphs - 3.MD.B.3 D) - Jorge, Nadia, Christopher and Megan went looking for lucky 4-leaf clovers this weekend and made a bar graph of what they found.
  • Perimeter Practice(3.MD.D.8) - Patricia loves to grow flowers! She has a beautiful garden filled with green shamrocks, white lilies, and orange marigolds. She wants to give them as gifts on St. Patrick's Day because green, white and orange are the colors of Ireland's flag.
  • Double and Single Digit Multiplication(4.NBT.B.5) - Solve the leprechaun's tricky multiplication problems to win his prize!
  • Units of Measure(4.MD.A.1) - Work in pairs to help solve Larry the Leprechaun's St. Patrick's Day troubles. Be sure to show your work so Larry can learn to solve problems on his own!
  • Division Share the Wealth(5.NBT.B. 6) - You found a pot of gold with a group of other people! You should share the gold equally. Use division to find out how many pieces you get to keep!
  • Decimal Addition and Subtraction(5.NBT.B.7) - Decimal Delilah challenged Lonnie Leprechaun to solve some tough math problems. Write the answers in Lonnie's balloons.
  • Volume(5.MD.C.5b) - I want to fill up some rectangular boxes with St. Patrick's Day treats! First, I need to find the VOLUME of each box.
  • Taylor's Favorite: Saint Patrick's Day(Mixed Standards) -


Grade 6, 7 and 8


  • Short Word Problems(6.RP.A.3) - Taylor is planning to give a report to her class about the history of St. Patrick's Day. She has made a colored map of Ireland and an activity sheet with a shamrock for each child to color and cut out. If there are 16 kids in Taylor's class, how many copies does she need to make to be sure everyone has one map and one shamrock?
  • Greatest Common Factors(6.NS.B.4) - The soda bread recipe calls for 3 cups of flour per loaf. How many cups of flour will Mrs. Connolly need for four loaves?
  • Median and Mean(6.SP.B.5c) - For each pair of numbers, write the greatest common factor inside the shamrock.
  • Leprechaun Interest(7.RP.A.3) - Steve, Jon, Amy and Sandy all brought green sugar cookies to class for St. Patrick's Day. Steve brought 4, Jon brought 8, Amy brought 10 and Sandy brought 6.
  • One Step Equation Word Problems(7.EE.B.4) - Larry the Leprechaun wants to be responsible with his money. He is going to take his gold to the bank, instead of hiding it at the end of a rainbow.
  • Slope-Intercept Form(8.EE.B.6) - Lonnie the Leprechaun thinks we might be able to find the mystery locations of his pots of gold using our advanced mathematical knowledge. If we know the slope of a rainbow, we can predict where it will end. Lonnie will be able to tell you the y, x, and y-intercept for each rainbow; just find the m.
  • Pythagorean Theorem(8.G.B.7) - Lonnie the Leprechaun hid his pots of gold all around town, and used right angle triangular distances to help him remember, but he forgot some of the information! Use what you know about the Pythagorean Theorem to help him figure out the hypotenuse where the rainbow ends.


How to Celebrate Saint Patrick's Day in Your Classroom

Everyone loves to celebrate this little understood holiday. It is funny how this celebration becomes more prevalent in students lives as they become more mature. In elementary, this normally the sixth most commonly celebrated non-religious holiday. As students advance to middle school it jumps to fourth. As student enter high school it makes the top three. In college a recent ASU study found it to be the most often observed holiday by students, while in session. In the math classroom there are so many different ways to show your appreciation. The most obvious is setting up a pot of gold counting activity. You can get a pot of gold and fill it with chocolate gold foil candies. That can prove to be fun for weeks. Just make sure the chocolate does not melt. Another fun game to play is math bingo; anything that involves a bit of luck is a knockout for this. You can do this a number of different ways. You can have students complete a series of problems and have their final answers be numbers within the bingo worksheet. You can also explore data that is related to Ireland. For younger students it could something as simple as weather and for high school students you could explore the economics behind the country domestically and internationally.