Home > Grade Levels > Grade 1 >

Ones and Tens Place Values

1.NBT.2
Answer Keys Here

Aligned To Common Core Standard:

Grade 1 Numbers - 1.NBT.2

As we start to make progress with math, we will constantly work with greater and greater values. Understanding the significance of each column of digits in a number is profound and required to move on to more advanced forms of math. I often encourage teachers to have students start this concept by writing values from standard to expanded form. For example: 83 is the standard form of writing a value and in expanded form of it is: 80 + 3. Each integer in that number differs by a power of ten. The integer to the furthest right is the ones column and the integer to left indicates the tens column. These worksheets introduce the concept of place value held within double digit numbers.

Guided Lessons

I covered current and past teaching methods to let teachers at all ranges have resources for their method.




Practice Worksheets

These sheets are all working this skill with many different methods of performing the same overall task.

 

58 Broken Into Places

What Are Ones and Tens Place Values?

Every digit, be it a two-digit number or more than two digits, has a place value. To make up large numbers, mathematics uses a system that is known as a place value system. It is the place of a digit in a number represented by its position in the number (column). The very first position (from the far right) in a digit is the ones position, and the second position (moving to the left) is the tens position. For example, the number 58 is a two-digit number. Understanding the position of 5 and 8 in this number is the understanding of place value. In this two-digit number, there are two place values. Understanding that 58 is made up of 50 and 8 rather than 5 and 8 is important. The place values increase with the addition of digits in the number. In this example we are using, 58, the place of 8 is at ones position and the place of 5 is at tens position. As the digits increase, the place values go from ones to tens to hundreds to thousands and so on, from right to left.

 

Why Are They Important to Learn?

People often confuse the importance of learning the names or labels of each column value with what actually holds value for students. It is much more beneficial to focus on how each column relates to the column that is located to the right or left of it. Since we are using a base ten math system, we start at 0 and once we have a value that goes past 9, this value is elevated to the next column or place. If we start at the ones place, as we move to the left each column is 10 times greater. As we move to columns that are to the right of each place is ten times less. This simple concept is literally the fundamental concept that applies to just about all operations.

While we have focused on reasoning why it is important, when you look at really world applications of this concept, the importance hits you like a brick. There are boundless real-world applications. Ask students whether they would rather like to have a $1, $10, or $100 bill in their pocket. Guess what all those differ by? Understanding this principle will help students realize the value of each digit within a two digit or greater value.