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Fractions to Mixed Numbers

4.NF.B.3b
Answer Keys Here

Aligned To Common Core Standard:

Grade 4 Fractions - 4.NF.B.3b

How Do You Convert an Improper Fraction to a Mixed Number? When studying fractions, students come across two types of fractions, including proper fractions and improper fractions. Proper fractions are the ones where the numerator is smaller than the denominator. The values of these fractions are within 0 and 1. Then there are improper fractions or top-heavy fractions, where the numerators are greater than the denominators. The value of these fractions is always greater than 1. There is another way to write improper fractions, and that is what we call mixed numbers or mixed fractions. A mixed fraction is one where you write a whole number beside a proper fraction. It comprises of a quotient, divisor, and remainder. You can very easily convert an improper fraction into a mixed number. Step 1: Division - Use the traditional division method to divide the numerator by the denominator. Identify the quotient, dividend, and the remainder. Step 2: Correctly Place the Number - The general form of a mixed number is; Quotient = Remainder/(Divisor ) You place the quotient, remainder, and the divisor in their respective places In these two simple steps, you can convert an improper fraction into a mixed number. A selection of worksheets and lessons that teach students the steps required to convert a top-heavy fraction to a mixed number.

Printable Worksheets And Lessons




Homework Sheets

Time to fatten up your fractions. We break it into two pretty simple steps for students.

  • Homework 1 - Write the mixed number as an improper fraction.
  • Homework 2 - Step #1: Find the product of the whole number and denominator.
  • Homework 3 - Step #2: Find the sum of that number and the numerator.



Practice Worksheets

Note the changes in format with these sheets. Numbers 1 and 3 go in one direction and number 2 goes in another.




Math Skill Quizzes

Once again, note the transformation that each set takes on below.