Home > Grade Levels > High School Functions >

Variable Expressions and Sequences

HSF-IF.A.3
Answer Keys Here

Aligned To Common Core Standard:

High School Interpreting Functions - HSF-IF.A.3

What Are Variable Expressions and Sequences? Variable Expressions - For understanding what variable expressions, let's take an example: Susan owns a cupcake bakery and gets a $2,500 in profit every day. She told her friend she would lend her $300, and she wants to find out how much she would be left with after lending her friend the money. Let's say that Susan doesn't have a clear idea of the number of days she's working, so she needs to use a variable. We know that variables are a representation of an unknown value. Let's take the letter d as a variable. For finding Susan's profit before she lent the money, we will multiply her daily profit with the number of days she is working, hence- 2500x d. This can also be written as 2500d. This is known as a term which means that there are numbers, variables or numbers and variables multiplied together. Now we need to consider the amount that will be deducted from Susan's profit i-e $300. For finding that, we will subtract the amount from Susan's daily profit, hence- 2500d-300. Since the 300 represents another term, the expression we have created is called variable expression! In plainer words, a combination of terms and operations that has at least one variable. These expressions come in handy when expressing a situation with unknown values. Sequences - In mathematics, a collection of objects which can also contain repetitions ais called a sequence. Sequences, like sets, also have elements that are referred to as members or terms. The length of the sequence depends on the number of members. If it goes on forever, it is known as an infinite sequence. When there is a known number of members, it is known as a finite sequence. Let's take an example: {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 ...} The sequence contains ellipses; therefore, it will be called an infinite sequence. {a, b, c, d, e, f} With a definitive number shown, the sequence will be called a finite sequence. This is a huge section of worksheets that help both students and teachers to learn how to break down expressions or simple sequences to solve a problem that is presented to you.

Printable Worksheets And Lessons






Homework Sheets

We start off with very manageable sequences to help students build some confidence.

  • Homework 1 - Find the first five terms of the sequence defined below, where n represents the position of a term in the sequence. Start with n = 1.
  • Homework 2 - The sequence 10, 20, 30... looks like 1, 2, 3...except each term is 10 times as large. So, the formula is 10n, where n represents the position of a term in the sequence. Check the first three terms.
  • Homework 3 - Where n is the nth term, a1 is the first term, r is the common ratio, and n is the position of a term in the sequence 5, 10, 20, 40...



Practice Worksheets

The practice sheets really start to make things a little bit demanding on students.

  • Practice 1 - Find the common ratio between consecutive terms.
  • Practice 2 - Find the first four terms of the sequence defined below, where n represents the position of a term in the sequence. Start with n = 3.
  • Practice 3 - Find the first three terms of the sequence defined below, where n represents the position of a term in the sequence. Start with n = 1.



Math Skill Quizzes

This should be a fair assessment of where kids stand with the skill.

  • Quiz 1 - Find the first two terms of the sequence defined below, where n represents the position of a term in the sequence. Start with n = 2. 4(2)^n
  • Quiz 2 - Make sure to double check the terms.
  • Quiz 3 - There are more crazy geometric sequences here.