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Addition Mad Minute Worksheets

1.OA.6

Aligned To Common Core Standard:

Grade 1 Operations - 1.OA.6

Math Mad Minute drills have been around and used by teachers for well over a half a century. The purpose of the sheets is to create a competitive environment for students to learn their basic math facts. The can be used for every and any math operation. The great part of this is that teachers can either make it a cooperative competition where students struggle against one another to be the first to finish the worksheet. They can also be used in an individual environment where students are just fighting against the clock. As the name implies these worksheets are set up to finished in one-minute. But they are skill and age appropriate. It for first graders a problem per second is asking a lot, but by third grade it should be cinch. I have seen many first graders be able to do just that. This series focus on the addition operation only. These worksheets have students add values in a left to right orientation. The answer keys are found within all the members resource worksheets.

  • Albert the Ape and Bananas Lesson- Albert really loves bananas. How many does he have? Albert the ape has 6 bananas. He sees 5 more bananas and collects them. How many bananas does Albert the ape have now?
  • Matching Sheet- I break from the standard drill method of learning this skill. Students are asked to match problems to their sum.
  • Worksheet 1 - Twenty problems for students to wrestle with. This provides you with three seconds to solve each problem.
  • Mad Minute 1 - 30 problems and 60 seconds on the clock. Below you will find more like this, but also the advanced pace as well.

Practice Worksheets

We have a mountain of practice for you. These are all set at 20 problems and have an attached key for quick answer checking.

  • Practice 2 - The first page is the problem sheets. The second page is the answer key.
  • Practice 3 - There are a number of different ways to attack these problems. Take a look below for the strategies that we tend to lean towards.
  • Practice 4 - It is helpful to learn these concepts using an addition table and flashcards can be super helpful too.
  • Practice 5 - It is always the best strategy to start by focusing on the larger number of the two.
  • Practice 6 - These are made to be completed in a minute, but when you first start out give yourself more time.
  • Practice 7 - If you can make the number 10 between the two values, it is often helpful to pull it out and focus on what you are left with.
  • Practice 8 - This is usually a good starting point for your foundation of math.
  • Practice 9 - If you are having difficulty with this skill, you may want to revert back to working with a numbers line.
  • Practice 10 - To increase your speed, start learning these sums mentally.
  • Practice 11 - A good way to improve your memory is simply practice. Wear out those flash cards.
  • Practice 12 - Sometimes rearranging the addends can make all the difference.



Mad Minutes

Again 30 problems for you to solve in 60 seconds. This is a solid pace to follow for this grade level.

  • Mad Minute 2 - This is where you would like to be 95% proficient and be able to complete the worksheets in under a minute.
  • Mad Minute 3 - Reaching the goal above should be when you graduate from the first grade.
  • Mad Minute 4 - Your goal here should first be getting everything correct and then work on your time used.
  • Mad Minute 5 - I encourage students to begin with getting these done in 3 minutes. Each week we then work to knock off 15 seconds.

Matching

Another one for you. I found it laying around in my old school files.

  • Sheet 2 - We once again are matching the operations to their sums using the column method.

 

Tips For Learning Addition Quickly

The addition operation is one of the most basic operations in mathematics, and it is always associated with the idea of moving forward, such as 1 + 1 = 2 or even as we approach using algebra regularly it appears as a + a = 2a. When we start learning the concept of math, we often start with count in forward direction which is exactly what adding is.

Here are some of the most important tips for learning addition:

Tip 1: Starting and Then Counting Upwards

Example: 6 + 3. Hint: Start from the larger number and counting upwards from it the exact number of times as the number that you adding to it. Using the example, we would start with 6 and count up three. So, it would look like: 6, 7, 8, 9. Our answer would be 9. How you order the counting can increase the difficulty or the number of time that you need to count. 3 + 6 is harder but 6 + 3 is easier. This will get you the same answer.

Tip 2: The Skip Strategy

If you have one of the numbers in the 10s, for example, 14, then you can use that to make a 10s jump and then add the remaining value. In this way you are simply breaking the values out to make them easier to work with. Example: 4 + 12 can also be visualized as 4 + 10 +2. I would even go an extra step and rewrite the problem to make the 10 appear last, this way you are just focused on the ones place: 4 + 2 + 10 = 6 + 10 = 16.

Tip 3: See if Any Numbers Add to 10

This will make counting numbers easier. Just as we showed you in the last example, you are simply placing a one in the tens column after. For example, if you have: 7 + 8 + 3 + 2 + 5. In this case, 7 + 3 and 8 + 2 both can make for. We could therefore rewrite this as 10 + 10 + 5 =. This will give you 20 and add the remaining 5 to make it 25.

Tip 4: Pulling Tens

For example, in the case of 14 + 5, do it 4 + 5 = 9 and then plus 10 to make it 19. This builds off of the Jump Strategy, but you get rid of that ten from the get go and just need to remember that it is there before you find the final sum.